Creating Spaces for Effective CVE Approaches

Have a look at the following.  It reminds me firstly of Bernie Mayer's Beyond Neutrality- if we as conflict resolution professionals are seeking to make an impact in the world, perhaps we have to move beyond the neutral role of mediators (and other neutral roles).

CVE (countering violent extremism) is an important part of promoting safety and engages in conflict resolution by being proactive.  Looking at this from a conflict resolution practitioner's lens, I'm an sure many readers will also see the great opportunities that can arise by applying our skills to this important effort.

Enjoy!

Unlike other counterterrorism strategies, countering violent extremism (CVE) focuses on preventing individuals from being recruited into or joining violent extremist groups.
CVE is a complex endeavor, largely because the reasons individuals become involved in extremist violence are in themselves complex and the dynamics are unique to each conflict. Using Kenya as an example, and drawing on observations from a recent visit, the author explores how promoting a more nuanced understanding of radicalization can help reach those who are at risk of being pushed and pulled into extremist violence.

See a summary and read the full report [HERE]. 

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Crisis Negotiation Techniques in Terrorist Incidents: It’s Been 10 Years Since Beslan- What Have We Learned?

With the Society for Terrorism Research (STR) 8th Annual International Conference fast approaching, STR, partnered with the Center for Terrorism and Security Studies (CTSS), is launching a series of guest blog posts, written by those who will be presenting their research at STR14. In the sixth installment of this series Detective Jeff Thompson(@nonverbalPhD) discusses his work on the lessons learnt from the Beslan School Siege. Detective Jeff Thompson is the 2013/2014 recipient of the New York City Police Department Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly Scholarship and attended Columbia University as Research Scholar.  His research topic was crisis and hostage negotiation as well as terrorism related incidents [This article does not reflect the opinion of any group or organization that he is employed by or a member of]. 




Ten years ago terrorists in Beslan, a town in North Ossetia Russia, seized a school full of children, in what is still one of the deadliest terrorist incidents to have occurred.  The incident provides valuable insight with respect to crisis and hostage negotiations that can assist negotiators and government officials to be better prepared if they were to be involved in a similar situation where negotiating with terrorists could be the best option to ensure the least amount of casualties are suffered.

Despite the incident having displayed numerous moments that were clear examples of the terrorists escalating violence, the Beslan incident also offers valuable insight into missed opportunities where negotiators could have employed certain tactics that could have increased the chances for a more peaceful resolution.

A review of this incident, specifically conducted by Adam Dolnik (and co-author of our paper) demonstrates that established crisis and hostage negotiation skills can be effective yet the established methods of determining if a hostage incident can or should be negotiated as well as the methods of measuring progress needs to be reviewed.


Read the full article [HERE] and click the info graphic to see a larger version of it.
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Angry Faces Win Negotiations


A recent study caught my attention as it deals with two of my favorite topics- negotiation and nonverbal communication.  Previous research has connected the two with respect to:



This current study, conducted at Harvard, connects when negotiator makes an angry facial expression with greater gains.

From redorbit:

Research has found that facial expressions can convey more information than verbal communication alone and a new Harvard University study has found that an angry glare can add effectiveness to a negotiator’s demands. 
Published in Psychological Science, the study found that an angry glare adds additional gravity to a negotiator’s threat to walk away from the talks. The researchers also saw that the glared-at party tended to offer more money than they otherwise would have.
The researchers said they went into their study with the theory that an angry expression would add credibility to a person’s demands – and make it more believable that they would walk away if their demands weren’t met. 
Read more about the study and the findings [HERE].


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Serena Williams: Tennis Champion & Master Negotiator?

How well does the information shared in negotiation books, blogs, and articles really work in the 'real world'?

We read so much about expanding pies, looking for joint-gains, the value of preparing, reducing the adversarial nature of the interaction, and working towards a (yep, here comes the cliche) win-win.

It's easy to think that in the fictional world of writing, the authors talk about previous real mediation or negotiation settings and tweak a thing here, modify a thing there, and bam- the impression is everything works and they are the masterful conflict resolution professional displaying the tools really work.  
Venus and Serena Williams- tennis and
negotiation champions.

Well, have a look at this snippet from the New York Times (thanks to recent ACRGNY awardee and all-around conflict resolution icon Carol Liebman for sharing it with me) on how Serena Williams brilliantly used her power, planned approach, and understanding of the 'opponent' to succeed.  No, I'm not talking about a win on the tennis court but rather one at the negotiation table.  

Williams praised what she called the progress the tournament had made in player amenities and prize money before asking for a more even distribution of men’s and women’s matches.
“The tone of the conversation wasn’t really, ‘Oh, you didn’t do this and that,’ ” Williams said. “It was: ‘Thank you for all the things you’ve done, and you’ve been so wonderful about listening to the players — both men and women — that we’d like to voice our concern on this arena.’ ”
She added: “I think the situation has to be win-win for everyone. No one likes to be pushed around, whether it’s a group or a person. I think if everyone can find a way that makes sense, then it’s a win-win.”

The negotiation (which included her sister Venus as well) was regarding gender equality with playing time on the main courts at Wimbledon.   

Read the rest here and see how these skills really do work.
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What I Learned About Social Leadership & Listening From a Hostage Negotiator

In her latest diary entry, Eugenie explains what charity leaders can learn from hostage negotiators

(From The Guardian)- As social leaders, we ask a lot of questions. What can I do to help? What do people need? What's my place in the world? But, what I've learned recently is: we should be asking far fewer questions.
As part of the Clore Social Leadership Programme that I'm on, we get training opportunities that we might not otherwise either know about or afford.
I got it into my head that I wanted to do some unusual training with unusual leaders and tracked down former hostage negotiator Dick Mullender. I confess, I was sold on the name alone and arranged a workshop on the art of listening and negotiation.
Dick Mullender
It was some of the best training I've been on. Mullender straight off challenged us on what we think it really means to listen…

Read more from The Guardian [HERE]. 
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