Building Trust in Volatile Situations


David Horsager Headshot
 

The recent "Siege in Sydney" provided me with the chance to consider how the Trust Edge illustrates a workable approach even in the most volatile, life-threatening and unpredictable situations. Police and military forces around the world have developed specific protocols for obtaining the safe release of hostages in an increasingly dangerous world. These protocols were born out of the aftermath of the 1972 Olympic hostage crisis in Munich, which tragically ended with the deaths of 9 hostages and one police officer. Wishing to get better results when similar incidents happened in the future, teams of professional negotiators, law enforcement and military personnel have developed a better way of managing these terrible situations...similar in many ways to the Trust Edge.

David then talks about the C's


  • Compassion
  • Connection & Connectivity
  • Commitment
  • Conclusion
I encourage you to read the full article [HERE]. 
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New NYPD Training: Conflict Resolution, Crisis Communication & "Smart Policing"

Have a look everyone, especially "Day 2":

New NYPD 3-Day Training For Officers Promotes "Smart Policing"


Mayor de Blasio and Police Commissioner Bratton gave details on the NYPD's new three-day training that all officers will attend.

The three day training will cover different topics ranging from using discretion, effective communication techniques to de-escalate situations, and tactical skills.

Approximately 20 thousand patrol officers will be trained first and then the remaining members of the Department will receive the training. The NYPD members being trained includes police officers as well as supervisors and police executives. Officers from the same commands will be training together to help them work as a team while performing patrol in the communities they serve.
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Creating Spaces for Effective CVE Approaches

Have a look at the following.  It reminds me firstly of Bernie Mayer's Beyond Neutrality- if we as conflict resolution professionals are seeking to make an impact in the world, perhaps we have to move beyond the neutral role of mediators (and other neutral roles).

CVE (countering violent extremism) is an important part of promoting safety and engages in conflict resolution by being proactive.  Looking at this from a conflict resolution practitioner's lens, I'm an sure many readers will also see the great opportunities that can arise by applying our skills to this important effort.

Enjoy!

Unlike other counterterrorism strategies, countering violent extremism (CVE) focuses on preventing individuals from being recruited into or joining violent extremist groups.
CVE is a complex endeavor, largely because the reasons individuals become involved in extremist violence are in themselves complex and the dynamics are unique to each conflict. Using Kenya as an example, and drawing on observations from a recent visit, the author explores how promoting a more nuanced understanding of radicalization can help reach those who are at risk of being pushed and pulled into extremist violence.

See a summary and read the full report [HERE]. 

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Crisis Negotiation Techniques in Terrorist Incidents: It’s Been 10 Years Since Beslan- What Have We Learned?

With the Society for Terrorism Research (STR) 8th Annual International Conference fast approaching, STR, partnered with the Center for Terrorism and Security Studies (CTSS), is launching a series of guest blog posts, written by those who will be presenting their research at STR14. In the sixth installment of this series Detective Jeff Thompson(@nonverbalPhD) discusses his work on the lessons learnt from the Beslan School Siege. Detective Jeff Thompson is the 2013/2014 recipient of the New York City Police Department Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly Scholarship and attended Columbia University as Research Scholar.  His research topic was crisis and hostage negotiation as well as terrorism related incidents [This article does not reflect the opinion of any group or organization that he is employed by or a member of]. 




Ten years ago terrorists in Beslan, a town in North Ossetia Russia, seized a school full of children, in what is still one of the deadliest terrorist incidents to have occurred.  The incident provides valuable insight with respect to crisis and hostage negotiations that can assist negotiators and government officials to be better prepared if they were to be involved in a similar situation where negotiating with terrorists could be the best option to ensure the least amount of casualties are suffered.

Despite the incident having displayed numerous moments that were clear examples of the terrorists escalating violence, the Beslan incident also offers valuable insight into missed opportunities where negotiators could have employed certain tactics that could have increased the chances for a more peaceful resolution.

A review of this incident, specifically conducted by Adam Dolnik (and co-author of our paper) demonstrates that established crisis and hostage negotiation skills can be effective yet the established methods of determining if a hostage incident can or should be negotiated as well as the methods of measuring progress needs to be reviewed.


Read the full article [HERE] and click the info graphic to see a larger version of it.
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Angry Faces Win Negotiations


A recent study caught my attention as it deals with two of my favorite topics- negotiation and nonverbal communication.  Previous research has connected the two with respect to:



This current study, conducted at Harvard, connects when negotiator makes an angry facial expression with greater gains.

From redorbit:

Research has found that facial expressions can convey more information than verbal communication alone and a new Harvard University study has found that an angry glare can add effectiveness to a negotiator’s demands. 
Published in Psychological Science, the study found that an angry glare adds additional gravity to a negotiator’s threat to walk away from the talks. The researchers also saw that the glared-at party tended to offer more money than they otherwise would have.
The researchers said they went into their study with the theory that an angry expression would add credibility to a person’s demands – and make it more believable that they would walk away if their demands weren’t met. 
Read more about the study and the findings [HERE].


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