Friday News Round Up



A Network Theory of Conflict Resolution

Definitely worth a read:
Creating an "energy landscape" from networks of friends and enemies could lead to a better way of resolving disputes.

"Suppose you have two friends who detest each other. The resulting awkwardness often resolves itself in one of two ways: either you drop one of your friends, or they find a way to reconcile," say Steve Strogatz and buddies from Cornell University. They go on to add that the overall social stress in these situations corresponds to a kind of energy that relaxes over time as relationships switch from hostility to friendship (or vice versa).
Read more [here], I know you want to, especially after glancing at that exciting graphic.


Bring Mediation In House Is Cost Effective
This story has been making the rounds on a few discussion groups:
...Resolving disputes through alternative dispute resolution, as opposed to litigation, is one way that a corporation can save money. ADR can also save the corporation time because it is often less disruptive to business operations than litigation. And, when it is used to resolve disputes with customers, it can have a positive impact on customer relations. Mediation, in particular, can be an effective way to resolve customer disputes in a way that is better for everyone involved.

...The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center began utilizing mediation about five years ago as a way to resolve certain legal disputes and grievances that patients or families (the center's "customers") have with the system.
Full article [here]

Maine Adds Foreclosure Mediation
...The basic result of this law is that every person being foreclosed upon now has the right to mediation, if they so choose ("opt-in") by filling out and returning a simple form. The model program on which this law is based originated in Connecticut.
Read more [here]

Preaching To The Choir
Yes, as the headline says and I know you heard and read it plenty of times, but read it again- the benefits of court connected mediation. This one is from Reno: Click here for the article.
In all cases, the mediators use a "facilitative model," the executive director said. After assembling in a conference room, the mediators work with the parties to identify the problems and possible solutions. Unlike in court, non-monetary solutions, such as repairing or returning property, are possible. If a decision is reached, it comes from the parties.
...The center's success rate--more than 90 percent, according to its Web site--is higher than the national average, he said.


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